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The best headphones deals in Australia

6 hours 56 min ago

With headphones of all types, colours and styles flooding the market, it’s hard knowing which ones to pick – do you go for the premium model you’ve always wanted, or are you better off just grabbing a cheap set from the discount bin?

Well, it’s worth remembering that cheap headphones are cheap for a reason, so even if saving money is priority we can’t recommend those $2 discount-bin variety that you find all over the world. And, as you’ll find out below, you don’t always have spend a lot of dosh to snag a great set of headphones either.

To save you the time and effort, we’ve put together this dedicated guide to the best bargains on great-sounding headphone. We constantly monitor major Aussie retailers and go a-huntin’ to bring you the most worthwhile deals on a variety of sets – from in-ear buds to noise-cancelling cans – so check out our continually updated list below to discover the best current headphones deals in Australia.

Best over-ear headphones deals this week

Bose QuietComfort 35 noise-cancelling over-ear headphones ($357.60; usually $499): Bose have been leading the way with premium audio for quite some time now, and with the QuietComfort series they’ve done well to bring that high fidelity to the wireless headphone market. With top-notch noise cancellation, a 20-hour battery life, and luxurious padding, the QC35 over-ear headphones will make your listening experience a pleasant one. By applying the code PTECH20 at checkout, you can grab a pair of QC35s for a low $357.60 from eBay in either black or silver until August 21.

Bose QuietComfort 25 noise-cancelling over-ear headphones ($277.60; usually $399): If you’re after the Bose quality without the price tag of some of their higher-tier models, or just simply don’t mind having wires, the QC25 may be for you. We gave them a full five stars when we reviewed them, praising their stunning noise-cancellation, full sound, and their ability to operate without a battery. Using the code PTECH20 at checkout, the QC25 headphones are only $277.60 when you shop on eBay, saving you $121 off the retail price of $399. This offer ends August 21.

Sony MDR-1000X noise-cancelling wireless over-ear headphones ($489; usually $699): Shut the world out when you want to enjoy your favourite tunes, podcasts or audiobooks with Sony’s top-of-the-line noise-cancelling over-ear Bluetooth headphones. We think it can give the Bose QC35 plenty of competition. Featuring swivel earcups, digital noise cancelling and its own carry case, these premium cans are currently on sale at Harvey Norman with 30% off on the RRP of 699. So hurry and grab a set of the Sony MDR-1000X for just $489 until September 10.

Sony MDR-ZX770BN noise-cancelling wireless over-ear headphones ($216; usually $299.95): If you aren’t too keen on a premium set of noise-cancelling cans, Sony even has a mid-range set on offer. Also featuring digital noise cancellation, the Sony ZX7770BN sports a 40mm driver and offers premium sound quality and build, a comfortable fit and darn good battery life for a budget price. We gave the cans 4.5 stars in our review. There’s also a saving of nearly $84 to be had when purchasing a set of the Sony ZX7770BN direct from the company – where they’re currently $216, down from $299.95.

Marley Legend ANC noise-cancelling over-ear headphones ($244.30, usually $349): Active noise cancellation and style come together in the House of Marley Legend ANC over-ear headphones. These cans lend a touch of style with FSC-certified wood touches, comfortable leather ear cushions and a detachable tangle-free cable. It even comes with a built-in battery, if you want to go wireless. Better yet, you get to save over $104 on these cool-looking House of Marley cans. They’re on sale at JB Hi-Fi for just $244.30 until August 23 or until stocks last.

Best in-ear headphones deals this week

Bose SoundSport Pulse wireless headphones ($249, usually $299): Bose have been leaders in audio gear for decades, so it’s no wonder they’ve got one of a pair of sports headphones which can monitor your heart rate while you listen to your favourite workout beats with the company’s signature sound quality. Bose’s StayHear+ Pulse ear tips promises to keep the set firmly in place even during the most vigorous workout routine. They’re usually $299 a pop, but save $50 and get a the Bose SoundSport Pulse for $249 until August 23 from JB Hi-Fi. If the retailer is out of stock, Bose has the SoundSport Pulse for the same price for a limited time as well.

Bose QuietControl 30 noise-cancelling wireless headphones ($314.40; usually $449): For a pair of in-ear headphones, the QC 30 has a level of noise cancellation that matches any of Bose’s over-ear cans, and that’s very impressive given its size. In fact, the level of noise cancellation can be adjusted to suit your environment via the in-line remote. But the effective noise-cancelling comes at the cost of sound quality. But if you’re not an audio connoisseur, these are still a pretty good set of headphones to get, especially for those who don’t particularly enjoy the feel of cans on their ears. The QC30 headphones are available for just $314.40 on eBay by using the code PTECH20 at checkout until August 21. That’s a huge saving of over $134.

Bose QuietComfort 20 noise-cancelling headphones (from $256; usually $369): For a pair of tethered in-ear headphones that cost you $369, you’d expect only the best from Bose, and the QC 20 does not disappoint. If you have the spare change and want incredible noise-cancelling combined with comfort and amazing sound quality, you really ought to get the QuietComfort 20. You can even save some dosh on these amazing headphones by heading to eBay and getting them for 20% off by using the code PTECH20 at checkout. The Android version of the QC20 in white is available for $256, while you can get the iOS version in black for $278.40. This offer ends August 21.

JBL Under Armour Sport HR in-ear wireless headphones ($269, usually $369): JBL has been making bass sound better and better, and the Under Armour Sports HR Bluetooth headphones promise to deliver just that with the company’s Signature Sound with Pure Bass technologies. Get details on your heart rate via the touch sensor on the right earbud and don’t worry about sweating all over it, thanks to its IPX5 rating. And until August 23, you can save $100 on the JBL Under Armour Sport HR headphones at JB Hi-Fi – available for just $269.

The best deals on our favourite headphones

To help you decide which headphones work best for you, we've decided to put together a little buying guide with a list of our favourite recommendations. 

The headphones you'll find here have tons of features to help you to get the most out of your music, or any other form of audio-visual entertainment you prefer, however you like to listen to it.

Bose QuietComfort 35

Bose has brought its fantastic noise-cancelling technology to a pair of wireless headphones and it's done so without any of the traditional drawbacks of wireless headphones. They sound great, and their battery life is long enough for all but the longest of flights. They're super comfortable, and despite the fact that they don't use the AptX Bluetooth standard, the wireless doesn't harm their sound quality one bit.

Priced at AU$499 a pop, the QC35s sit firmly at the premium end of the spectrum, but if you want the best noise-cancelling headphones available right now, then you can't get any better. And they can be bought at a great price, too.

Read our review of the Bose QC 35.

Bose QuietControl 30

For a pair of in-ear headphones, the QC 30 has a level of noise cancellation that matches any of Bose’s over-ear cans, and that’s very impressive given its size. In fact, the level of noise cancellation can be adjusted to suit your environment via the in-line remote.

But the effective noise-cancelling comes at the cost of sound quality. The QC 30 isn’t the best-sounding headphones in the world, but if you’re not an audio connoisseur, these are still a pretty good set of headphones to get, especially for those who don’t particularly enjoy the feel of cans on their ears.

Read our review of the Bose QC 30.

Bose QuietComfort 25

The QC 25 are just as good as Bose’s premium cans, but without the premium price tag. They’re still expensive at $399 a piece, but they achieve top performance per dollar and definitely worth your hard-earned dosh.

With exemplary sound quality and equally excellent ambient noise cancellation, the QC 25 will suit the serious or the casual listener, providing a wonderfully immersive experience when watching movies or TV shows, playing games or just listening to your favourite beats.

Read our review of the Bose QC 25.

Bose QuietComfort 20

For a pair of tethered in-ear headphones that cost you $369, you’d expect only the best from Bose, and the QC 20 does not disappoint. If you have the spare change and want incredible noise-cancelling combined with comfort and amazing sound quality, you really ought to get the QuietComfort 20.

The silicone ear tips are designed for a perfect fit while sealing the ear canal and the power for noise-cancellation comes from a lithium-ion battery. This makes the battery pack a tad unwieldy, but you’ll figure out how best to stow it as you go along. But all in all, these are one of the best headphones we’ve put through the paces.

Read our review of the Bose QC 20.

Sennheiser Momentum Wireless on-ear headphones

These no-holds-barred wireless headphones are oozing with positive qualities, but the cans don't come cheap. However, if you're an audio lover that can spare the expense, do not hesitate on this comfortable, hard-working set of headphones that will likely last for years.

Stainless-steel arms and leather finishes gives the headphones a rugged look, while the ball-jointed swivelling earcups provide ample movement and comfort. Battery-savers will find the wired option to be convenient, but you can also turn the headphones on to activate active noise cancellation.

Read our review of the Sennheiser Momentum Wireless over-ear headphones.

Oppo PM-3

The Oppo PM-3 is a truly stunning pair of headphones. Make no mistake, we've reviewed a lot of headphones over the years but none have we become more fond of than the PM-3.

They're equally comfortable being plugged into a headphone amp at home as they are commuting through the hustle and bustle of the big smoke, and they stand head and shoulders above rival products from bigger brands. We really can't recommend them highly enough, they're just amazing.

Read our review of the Oppo PM-3.

Sennheiser Momentum In-ear headphones

With the appealing candy apple detailing, Sennheiser gets you in the door. But once you're in, you'll stay for the killer sound quality that comes from the Momentum In-Ear earphones. And you won't have a problem that it's tethered.

Capable of providing booming, tight bass straight to your ear canal, the Momentum In-ear buds will have you foot-tapping to practically every tune you listen to.  And for a low-cost set of in-ears, they're as fine as they come.

Read our review of the Sennheiser Momentum In-ear headphones.

If you're after more information on headphones in different form factors, take a look at some of our other dedicated audio articles:

Silent song jumps up iTunes charts to fix iPhone in-car annoyance

Wed, 08/16/2017 - 09:33

If you're an iPhone owner who likes to listen to the songs from your iTunes library while cruising along the highways and byways of the world, you'll have probably encountered an annoying quirk of plugging your phone into your car's sound system.

Many car stereos, by default, automatically play the first track in your iTunes library as soon as you plug your phone in. As a result you'll have that one song eternally ruined for you, as you repeatedly hear those opening bars, and scramble to silence it and find the tune you're actually looking for.

But now Songwriter Samir Mezrahi has come up with a simple, yet ingenious solution: the sound of silence.

It's oh so quiet

Channelling John Cage's silent 4'.33, in which he has an orchestra sit silently for four minutes and thirty-three seconds, Mezrahi's track 'A A A A A Very Good Song' plays for 10, silent, minutes. Gaming the alphabetically-organized library with the five 'A's in its title, it gives drivers a 10-minute grace period to set up the tunes they want, without being bombarded by unwanted cuts from their iTunes selection.

It answers a massive oversight on behalf of Apple and in-car audio manufacturers, and is selling well as a result, steadily climbing the global iTunes charts, with one tongue-in-cheek reviewer calling it a "modern masterpiece".

Mezrahi's clever efforts probably deserve the loose change it'll cost you to buy his single, but if you're feeling tight-fisted you could achieve similar results for free by creating an audio note with multiple 'A's at the start of its title and importing it into your iTunes library.

Alexa support is now built into Ultimate Ears wireless speakers

Wed, 08/16/2017 - 09:03

Want to get chatty with your Bluetooth speaker? Then if you're the proud owner of selected Ultimate Ears devices you're in luck, as the Boom 2 and Megaboom wireless speakers now support Alexa voice commands.

That means the portable sound systems can be controlled using Amazon's digital assistant, letting you play music, check sports scores or set reminders wherever a wireless internet connection is available.

Simply open the Alexa app on your Android device, hit the Bluetooth button and say what you need.

Alexa on the road

It essentially makes Alexa a portable companion, beyond the stay-at-home Echo and Echo Dot wired devices. 

But it does come with a few limitations. Firstly, the 'Just Tap and Ask' feature that the Ultimate Speakers rely upon is an element exclusive to the Android build of the Alexa app, ruling paired iOS devices out. Secondly, a number of Android devices aren't supported for "known experience reasons", including Pixel and OnePlus phones, as well as the Huawei Mate 9.

Still, if you're an existing owner of the Ultimate Ears speakers, and happen to have an Android device handy, this is a nice bonus to have.

Amazon Great Indian Sale Day 3: best deals on Bluetooth speakers

Fri, 08/11/2017 - 10:17

Today is the third day of the Amazon Great Indian Sale and Amazon is offering some good deals on mobiles, accessories, laptops, etc. Bluetooth speakers have become popular over the last few years. In this list, we are going to look at some of the deals being offered on Bluetooth speakers.

JBL Flip 3 @ Amazon @ Rs. 8,980 (Save Rs. 3,010)

Apart from being one of the most popular Bluetooth speakers on this list, this is also the costliest one. The JBL Flip 3 is being offered for Rs. 8,980, down from its original price of Rs. 11,990. The speaker comes with a 3,000mAh battery and weighs 449 grams.

Sony SRS-XB10 @ Amazon @ Rs. 3,300 (Save Rs. 1,690)

The Sony SRS-XB10 Bluetooth speaker is available for Rs. 3,300 compared to its original price of Rs. 4,990. The speaker comes with a 1,400mAh battery and weighs 399 grams. It comes with IPX5 Waterproof certification.

Boat Stone 600 @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,799 (Save Rs. 2,191)

The Boat Stone 600 Bluetooth speaker is currently being offered at Rs. 1,799 compared to its regular price of Rs. 3,990. The speaker comes with Bluetooth 4.0 support and comes with IPX6 water and dust resistance.

Portronics POR-567 @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,649 (Save Rs. 850)

The Portronics POR-567 is available for Rs. 1,649, down from its regular price of Rs. 2,499. You save Rs. 850 on this deal. The speaker weighs 440 grams.

JBL GO @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,899 (Save Rs. 1,591)

The JBL GO Bluetooth speaker is currently being offered at Rs. 1,899, down from its regular price of Rs. 3,490. The speaker comes with a 600mAh battery and weighs 132 grams.

Boat Stone 200 @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,579 (Save Rs. 911)

The Boat Stone 200 is currently available for Rs. 1,579 compared to its original price of Rs. 2,490. The speaker comes with Bluetooth 4.1 support. It comes with a 1,500mAh battery and weighs 349 grams. It comes with IPX5 certification.

Philips BT64B @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,349 (Save Rs. 650)

The Philips BT64B is available for Rs. 1,349 compared to its original price of Rs. 1,999. You can save Rs. 650 on this deal. The speaker comes with built-in FM tuner. It weighs 145 grams.

Philips BT50B @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,299 (Save Rs. 700)

The Philips BT50B is being offered at Rs. 1,299, down from its original price of Rs. 1,999. It comes with 6 hours of battery life and weighs 90 grams.

Zoook ZB-JAZZ @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,240 (Save Rs. 259)

The Zoook ZB-JAZZ is available for Rs. 1,240 compared to its original price of Rs. 1,499. The speaker comes with an 1,800mAh battery and weighs 299 grams.

Logitech X50 @ Amazon @ Rs. 1,099 (Save Rs. 1,396)

The Logitech X50 is currently available for Rs. 1,099 compared to its original price of Rs. 2,495. It comes with Bluetooth support and a 3.5mm audio jack. It weighs 141 grams.

Also check out the best deals offered by Amazon on TVs, Apple products, refrigerators and more.

Google Pixel 2's missing headphone jack could be justified by Android O

Wed, 08/09/2017 - 20:05

If recent rumors are to be trusted, the Google Pixel 2 won’t feature the common 3.5mm headphone jack. It won’t be the first to rid of it – the iPhone 7, HTC U11 and the Moto Z were among the more popular models to lop it off in the last year. And it certainly won’t be the last.

It’s difficult to excuse any company for leaving out such a trusty port. But unlike other smartphone manufacturers, the Google Pixel 2 might have the best reason for cutting the cord so far: Android O. Specifically, the new operating system’s support for a plethora of high-quality Bluetooth codecs, including aptX, aptX HD and LDAC.

A codec, by the way, is a data compression standard. Many of today's popular Bluetooth codecs, like AAC and SBC are highly compressed and if you're a discerning listener, these typically don't result in a great listening experience. 

Typically, the onus to include support for one of these low-compression codecs has been on the side of the device manufacturer. To name a few examples from the past, we’ve seen the LG G5’s support for aptX HD, as well as the many, many Sony Xperia smartphones that support LDAC, the company’s own Hi-Res audio codec. If you want solid wireless performance, only a few Android phones can suit those needs.

But given what we’ve seen in the Android O developer preview, this practice seems to be shifting away from the currently fragmented per-device basis to potentially encompassing each and every device running the latest Android software. 

While one company cites “courage” as the inspiration behind leaving out the legacy port, and others offer up nary a reason for doing the same, the Pixel 2’s total shift to wireless might be the most encouraging nudge for those who are hesitant to make the switch to wireless headphones due to the warranted worry of reduced sound quality. Additionally, the lack of headphone jack in Google’s next flagship could actually be the one to push the wireless headphone industry forward.

Still, it’s hard not to consider that Google could be making the same strides in wireless all while keeping the headphone jack. Why does one have to come at the expense of the other?

Wireless: still tangled, but less so

Ditching the headphone jack in the Pixel 2 will likely deter the many people who prefer wired headphones. But Android O’s support for the aforementioned codecs (not to mention the millions who will eventually use it) will ideally incentivize headphone makers to make the move to high-quality wireless audio and, better yet, offer it up for less cash than we’ve seen. 

There’s nothing on the market that’s as handy and trustworthy as wired headphones. But I’ll go on a limb and say that we’ve already seen a lot of awesome products that fill the 3.5mm-sized gap nicely (and on the cheap), like the Nuforce Optoma BE6i and the Sennheiser HD 4.50 BTNC–both of which utilize the aptX codec. 

On the more expensive side of things, Sony’s LDAC-compatible wireless headphones start at $199. The next step is the $349 Sony MDR-1000X –a bit too costly for some, but worth it for the quality-conscious. Here's hoping that if LDAC becomes ubiquitous, Sony will make more affordable options and perhaps, other companies might license the codec for their own use.

If Google drops the 3.5mm jack and fills the void with high-quality wireless codec support, it will ideally create a surge of high-quality, lower-cost wireless products.

Obviously, Google hasn’t officially shown off the Pixel 2 yet, so we don’t know if it will feature the 3.5mm jack or not. Heck, Android O hasn’t fully launched either, so who knows if this broad codec support will make it into the final version. All we have to go off of are rumors and hopes that the omission will bring about some positive change instead of no change at all.

Deezer is coming to Google Home, and it's bringing Flow along for the ride

Tue, 08/08/2017 - 08:00

Soon you'll be able to listen to music via Deezer through your Google Home smart speaker, and you'll be able to control playback entirely through your voice. 

On the surface this might not seem like the most interesting of announcements. After all, the smart speaker already supports Spotify, and since the voice commands are likely to be identical why would you care whether your music is being streamed from Deezer's servers instead?

The difference is that Deezer has an excellent feature called 'Flow', which dynamically builds playlists based on your pre-existing music-listening habits

Get into the flow 

Simply ask your Google Home speaker to 'Play my Flow' and it will dynamically generate a playlist based on your existing listening preferences. 

You can also sculpt your Flow playlist through your Google Home by telling it which songs you do and don't like to allow it to better learn your preferences over time. 

We think this has the potential to work excellently through the Google Home speaker where it can be a hassle to try and name specific artists or songs. 

But even more cleverly is that Deezer will integrate with Google's voice recognition system to understand who's asking for their Flow, and to personalise its playlist accordingly. 

Of course, if you'd like to play music the traditional way then you'll also be able to select songs and artists manually using your voice.  

Deezer for Google Home is currently available in Germany and France, and will be coming to the US, UK and Australia 'later this year'. 

Spotify for Xbox One all but confirmed with Microsoft app store listing

Mon, 08/07/2017 - 09:54

A new app listing for Spotify has appeared on Microsoft's app store, suggesting that the service will be rolled out imminently for the Xbox One, although the app is not currently available for download. 

The listing follows the news last week that Larry Hryb (known as Major Nelson) had been spotted using the app.

Following the discovery, the app was then spotted in Hryb's Xbox news YouTube show (via: Windows Central). A source has also confirmed to The Verge that the music service is incoming. 

Parity with PlayStation

The Xbox One will not be the first console to get Spotify support. The service came to the PS4 back in 2015, allowing gamers to listen to streamed music while they game. 

From the looks of the app listing the functionality will be similar on Xbox One. The listing confirms that you'll be able to 'Play music free and on-demand' and 'listen in the background'. 

It might be late, but the addition will be important if Microsoft wants to reach feature parity with the PS4, which has outsold it fairly consistently since the two consoles went on sale. 

Amazon Echo price in the US cut in half until midnight tonight

Fri, 08/04/2017 - 17:55

There's a new low Amazon Echo price today in the US, meaning it's probably the best time to buy it before Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

It's $89.99 until midnight tonight through a bunch of non-Amazon websites like Bloomingdales, PC Richard & Son,  Bed, Bath & Beyond and Best Buy.

What's interesting is that not only is the Amazon.com price more expensive than this at the normal $179, Amazon's refurbished units are still $129.99. Ouch.

Time-sensitive Amazon Echo deal

Of course, the catch is that these online retailers will only have the Amazon Echo available at the discounted price for less a few hours longer.

It appears to be a way to lure you to their website, maybe in a hope that you'll buy something else on Bloomingdales or PC Richard & Son.

This is also the ideal time to discount the Amazon Echo price. Even if you wanted to pay the full $179.99, Amazon in the US lists it as out of stock until next week. 

Amazon's only deal on the Echo family of speakers is to discount them if you buy two of the same kind, including the new Amazon Echo Show speaker. 

Get the Amazon Echo deal here (expires at 12am)

Jabra Elite Sport wireless earbuds are more than just good audio

Thu, 08/03/2017 - 15:46

Jabra has launched a new set of truly wireless earbuds under its Elite franchise in India on Wednesday. By truly we mean there is no wire involved at all, just like the Apple AirPod. Touted as Jabra Elite Sport, the earbuds offer a wireless experience to the users, which makes them a wise choice for the fitness fanatics.

The earphones come with a broad range of audio training tools and an advanced fitness analysis technology, which includes an in-ear heart rate monitor and VO2 Max data that promises to measure the fitness of the user with 90 percent accuracy. This data is then delivered by the Jabra Sports Life app in real-time via in-ear coaching feature of the earphone. Furthermore, the app is supposed to enable users to improve their fitness levels by providing information like distance covered, pace, route, and calories burnt.

Going by what the company claims, the earbuds offer superior audio quality for calls and music. Also, the earphones come with four microphones in total having a set of two mics in each of them. Out of which, one is used for answering calls, while the other works on canceling the external noise at the same time. They also support all the major operating systems including Android and iOS and can be easily paired with any smartphone.

The company also promises to offer 4.5 hours of calls and music when fully charged along with an additional charging capacity of up to 9 hours of charge stored in the carry case. To recall, Jabra is not the only company that is coming up with this technology. We have seen something similar on the Apple AirPods, which is already available in the market.

Keeping fitness as the prime motive, Jabra Elite Sports are IP67 certified and also offer a three-year warranty against sweat on the product. 

The earphones will be available to the users from Aug 8 onward at a price of Rs 18,990.

The best over-ear headphones for 2017

Tue, 08/01/2017 - 15:07

It can be hard picking out the best pair of over-ear headphones from a line-up. There are simply so many options out there – each of which offer a different combination of performance, features and value. 

But instead of testing all of them by your lonesome, we've done the heavy lifting for you by compiling a guide to the best over-ear headphones for 2017.

Why buy a pair of over-ear headphones in the first place?

In-Ear headphones are better suited for trips to the gym, and for travelling on-ears provide a good balance of sound quality and portability. But when you're in the comfort of your own home and want to listen to music with absolutely no compromises on sound quality, then over-ear headphones are the way to go. 

They can be bulky, but the benefit is that by sitting over, rather than on, your ears, they're much more comfortable when worn for long periods of time. 

We've got picks from right across the price spectrum, so whatever you want to spend you should be able to find a pair of cans that are right for you. 

  1. Oppo PM-3
  2. Philips Fidelio X2
  3. Beyerdynamic DT 1770 Pro
  4. Focal Listen
  5. Sennheiser Momentum Wireless
  6. Bose QuietComfort 35
  7. Sony MDR-1000X
  8. Audio-Technica ATH-MSR7
  9. Focal Listen Wireless

The Oppo PM-3's are a truly stunning pair of headphones. Make no mistake, we've reviewed a lot of headphones in the last 10 years but none have we become more fond of than the PM-3.

They're equally comfortable being plugged into a headphone amp at home as they are commuting through the hustle and bustle of a big city, and they stand head and shoulders above rival products from bigger brands. We really can't recommend them highly enough, they're just amazing.

Read the full review: Oppo PM-3

The Philips Fidelio X2's are a superb pair of headphones offering premium comfort and build quality with a sound that rivals even the most vaunted audiophile cans.

Read the full review: Philips Fidelio X2

The Beyerdynamic DT 1770 Pros are a stunning pair of headphones. Are they expensive? To some no, to most yes; but for the sheer listening experience they deliver you'd be hard pressed to take them off after putting them on, even using them with portable HRA players and mobile phones.

That said, they really do push the boundaries of what you can do with a dynamic driver. All praise to Beyerdynamic for putting together such a wonderful product.

Read the full review: Beyerdynamic DT 1770 Pro

The Focal Listen offer wonderfully balanced sound and great noise isolation. Overall, the Focal Listen offer a thoroughly enjoyable listening experience. They offer stellar balance, build quality and understated design – and while they may not be as high resolution as the Pioneer SE-MHR5 and other headphones capable of High-Res Audio playback, their sound-to-dollar ratio is impressive.

At $250 (£150, AU$329), however, they're not cheap but you actually get a lot for your money (see: sound and build quality). Should Focal continue to pump out cans that provide balanced sound and top-notch build quality at an affordable price, audiophiles might look more and more in the French company's direction.

Read the full review: Focal Listen

These no-holds-barred wireless headphones are oozing with positive qualities, but for many, they're almost prohibitively expensive. However, if you're an audio lover that can spare the expense, do not hesitate on this comfortable, hard-working set of headphones that will likely last for years.

Read the full review: Sennheiser Momentum Wireless

Bose has finally brought its fantastic noise-cancelling technology to a pair of wireless headphones and it's done so without any of the traditional drawbacks of wireless headphones. They sound great, and their battery life is long enough for all but the longest of flights.

At $349, the QC35s sit firmly at the premium end of the spectrum, but if you want the best noise-cancelling headphones available right now then you can't get any better.

Read the full review: Bose QuietComfort 35

The MDR-1000X are definitely the closest competitor to Bose's QuietComfort series I've ever had the pleasure of testing. Some high-end codecs (LDAC, AAC and aptX) help the 1000X sound even better than the QC35s, but ultimately the noise canceling is a bit less effective in Sony's pair of cans.

What should drive your decision on whether to buy the MDR-1000X is your music player – if you're a Sony Xperia owner, you'd be hard-pressed to find a pair of headphones that sound as good as these with noise canceling tech built-in. Even if you're not, Sony's wares are still worth a listen – and maybe a purchase – if you aren't too put out by its $349 price tag.

Read the full review: Sony MDR-1000X

It can be an expensive journey if you're looking for a set of headphones that sound as good as they look. That's why Audio-Technica's MSR7 are a sight (and sound) to behold if good sound and sharp build quality are priorities.

These wired headphones retail for $199, which isn't cheap, but we think you'll love these. Why? First off, the sound is incredibly well-balanced, pushing out crisp highs and deep lows without distortion. Second, the build materials and included goodies help to offset the cost.

Read the full review: Audio-Technica ATH-MSR7

If you like the sound quality of Focal's Listen line of headphones but wished they were slightly more wireless, then the Focal Listen Wireless might be a better choice. 

They're slightly more expensive at $299 (£220, about AU$374), but for that money you get the same great audio resolution, and warm lush mids, which surprisingly see very little compromise in spite of the wireless operation. 

While sound quality is good, we've included the headphones slightly lower down our list because their high price isn't matched by the same amount of features as the competition. There's no noise-cancellation for one, and nor is there any NFC pairing. 

Nevertheless, if you want premium sound from a wireless pair of headphones, then the Focal Listen Wireless are a great choice. 

Read the full review: Focal Listen Wireless

The best Australian Chromecast deals in August 2017

Tue, 08/01/2017 - 02:36

The Google Chromecast is not only one of the most useful and innovative gadgets of the last few years, it's also dazzlingly cheap. And if you're looking to pick one up for the cheapest possible price, you've come to the right place!

Chromecast is a Wi-Fi HDMI dongle that you plug directly into your TV. From there you can use your smartphone or tablet to 'throw' video at your TV over Wi-Fi – whether it be Netflix movies, live football matches from the major broadcasters or simply just a funny YouTube video. On this page we'll find you the best prices for the Chromecast Ultra, Chromecast 2 (or just Chromecast now) and Chromecast Audio and explain how they differ.

What is a good Chromecast deal?

This one's easy. The standard price for a Chromecast 2 is about $58. You should never, ever pay more than that because you can always find one for that price.

Chromecast 2 deals

The Chromecast 2, or 'new Chromecast' as it's also known, is very similar to the now almost-extinct 2013 Chromecast. Sure, it looks a little different. And it's got slightly faster network performance and a few other tweaks such as coming with a dangly cable instead of as a rigid stick. But, essentially, it's the same product in a different shape – that's why the prices were basically the same. If you can find one for the same price, get this new one.

Chromecast Audio deals

While it doesn't offer true multi-room streaming at the moment (fingers crossed that comes soon), this easy-to-use and affordable device modernises any trusty set of wired speakers you already own with wireless capabilities. In doing so, it also opens them up to features that will grow and get even better over time. Got an old set of speakers or an ancient iPod dock? Turn it into a wireless speaker with Chromecast Audio!

Chromecast Ultra deals

The 4K Chromecast Ultra is the newest member of the Chromecast family. If you have a 4K TV or are planning on getting one, it's certainly worth picking one of these up. This micro streamer cheap, effective and makes the jump from 1080p to 4K HDR seamlessly.

Chromecast Ultra deals are usually around $95, so anything cheaper is an added bonus.

Android's next skill may be tracking Bluetooth device battery life

Mon, 07/31/2017 - 23:35

As wireless headphones become less a novelty and more the  status quo, tracking the battery life of your Bluetooth accessories is crucial for avoiding running out of juice at an inopportune moment.

As such, it appears the Android Open Source Project is working on a way for the Google-powered platform to track the battery life of Bluetooth devices, according to a report from XDA Developers.

While iPhone users have been able to track the battery levels of their Bluetooth accessories since iOS 9, Android users don't have such a uniform way of tracking their peripherals' power.

As noted in the report, certain Samsung, LG and OnePlus devices have their own ways of displaying, while others are stuck relying on third-party applications like BatON to know if they should grab their charger cables.

Even if Google is working on this new feature, it's not a confirmation it will show up in Android's next big update. It's also still up to Bluetooth device manufacturers to ensure their products can communicate energy data using Android's API, meaning Google can only meet halfway towards a solution.

Though there's still a fair share of work ahead, we think a proper battery-tracking feature will be well worth it for Android users — especially if more devices (possibly even Google's own Pixel 2) follow Apple's lead and ditch the headphone jack, necessitating the need for more and more sans-fil accessories.

Apple pulls plug on iPods you didn’t even know it still sold

Thu, 07/27/2017 - 20:02

Fans of taking thousands of tunes in tiny vessels are in for some bad news, as Apple is discontinuing the iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle and removing them from their brick-and-mortar and digital stores.

While the two pocket-sized members of the long-running iPod family will be no more, its last remaining representative — the iPod Touch — will live on in a 64GB model for $199 (about  £150/AU$250) and 128GB model for $299 (about  £230/AU$375), offering extra storage over previous 16GB and 64GB versions for the same price.

"Today, we are simplifying our iPod lineup with two models of iPod Touch, now with double the capacity, starting at just $199, and we are discontinuing the iPod Shuffle and iPod Nano," Apple said in a statement to Bloomberg.

Shuffled away

A staple for joggers, partygoers, schoolkids and everywhere in between, the iPod Nano took over the classic iPod's role as a high-capacity song machine that fit your pocket, while the bite-sized Nano's flash memory and clip-on attachment made it a hit with the gym crowd.

However, as Apple focused more on its app-driven iOS infrastructure and pushing services like Apple Music, devices like the Nano and Shuffle — which were already long overdue for an update — became lower priorities for the tech giant.

Now the iPod Touch, essentially an iPhone without cellular capabilities, is the new standard for those just wanting to tote around their favorite tunes. 

Should those folks still want to avoid the hustle and bustle of apps and Wi-Fi connectivity, they will just have to look into a new MP3 player or take extra-good care of their legacy Shuffle or Nano — it's now a collector's item.

Google Play Music and YouTube Red could merge into the ultimate streaming service

Thu, 07/27/2017 - 19:04

Could you, off the top of your head, name the differences between Google Play Music, YouTube Red and YouTube Music? Do you know which one offers more songs? Do you know what the price difference is? How about the benefits of each service? 

If you can’t answer those questions, don’t worry. Turns out one of Google’s top execs is confused about the whole thing, too. 

The person in question is Lyor Cohen, Google’s emissary to the larger music world, and his problem with Google’s music streaming services is that they’re just too similar. 

So, what’s his solution? Combine them into a new super service that spans both YouTube and the larger music streaming world that could take on the market leader: Spotify. 

Cohen’s plans were unfurled during a panel session for the New Music Seminar conference in New York where, according to The Verge, when he was asked about why YouTube Red isn't more popular with music users, he responded, "The important thing is combining YouTube Red and Google Play Music, and having one offering."

It’s important to point out, however, that Google has yet to rubber stamp Cohen’s plan, and Cohen was largely speaking about his own issues with the services rather than any set plans for the near future. 

If the changes were to happen, Google says it would give users notice well in advance: "Music is very important to Google and we’re evaluating how to bring together our music offerings to deliver the best possible product for our users, music partners, and artists," the company said in a statement sent to The Verge. 

"Nothing will change for users today and we’ll provide plenty of notice before any changes are made."

Music streaming harder, better, faster, stronger

A single combined service would fix a few issues the services have in their current state. See, the way things are now, a subscription to YouTube Red gets you a subscription to Google Play Music and vice versa. YouTube Red was first launched to disable ads on YouTube videos, but then also became a music streaming service in its own right when Google built-in the ability to stream music directly from music videos on YouTube. 

One unified service would potentially bring a united front against the likes of Spotify and potentially help in negotiations with record companies.

Will Google eventually combine all its streaming services into one Voltron-esque super service? Who knows, we might just Get Lucky.

15 Years of iPod: (Almost) every iPod ranked from best to worst

Thu, 07/27/2017 - 18:12

Update: Apple broke the news that it will take the heads man's axe to some of our favorite MP3 players, the iPod Shuffle and iPod Nano. This news comes just three years after Apple killed off its iconic iPod Classic. Soon, only one relic of the early aughts will remain – the iPod Touch. To celebrate the lives of two of our favorite players, we've resurfaced this guide to the best iPods ever made, ranked best to worst.

The iPod might not have technically been the first digital music player (according to Wikipedia), but it’s the one people think of as having brought MP3 players to the masses. 

If Apple was the one to create the digital music player, it was also the one to kill it. Nowadays it’s much less common for people to carry around a dedicated music player (although there are plenty of reasons you might want to do so) because of how good smartphones have gotten at playing your music. 

Their 3G connectivity also means that they’re a much better fit for streaming services, which is increasingly how people are consuming their music. 

Nowadays the iPod Classic is long-gone, and all that remains is the iPod touch and the portability-focussed Nano and Shuffle. 

It’s been a massive 15 years since the first generation of iPod was released, and in that time the lineup has seen a lot of changes, some for better, and some for worse. 

So without further ado here’s our list of Apple’s best iPods, ranked from best to worst. 

This might be a controversial decision, but in our opinion the best iPod was the fourth generation of the iPod Nano.

Hear us out. 

The fourth generation was where the Nano series found the perfect mix between old and new. It had the small form-factor of the Nano, but maintained the classic iPod scroll wheel, and also added an accelerometer so that you could view videos in a landscape format. 

Granted you wouldn’t be able to fit that many videos into its maximum of 16GB of space, but frankly it was 2008 and you need to chill out. 

First released in 2007, the sixth generation of the iPod (otherwise known as the iPod Classic), was where the iPod brand stopped being a focus for Apple. 

You don’t have to look far for the reason; 2007 also saw the release of the first iPhone, which would go on to lead the smartphone revolution, and make mass-market music players essentially obsolete. 

But the iPod Classic continued to make a decent argument for its own existence, by increasing capacities up to 160GB, at which point you could start going all out with massive libraries of lossless music. 

It might have been bulky by iPhone standards, but the iPod Classic managed to stick around for seven years until Apple finally ceased production in 2014. It will always exist as the archetypal iPod. 

Back in the iPhone’s infancy, the iPod Touch line was a more affordable way for you to experience the new world of smartphone apps without having to pay for a full-on iPhone.

Granted, you’d be limited to Wi-Fi rather than 3G or 4G connectivity, but the Touch line is nevertheless a very useful series of devices, which are great for both listening to music as well as watching videos and playing iOS games. 

We’ve gone for the sixth generation of iPod touch on our list because it’s the most recent and hence has the most capacity and fastest processor, although for our money its lack of a bright color-scheme makes the fifth generation touch the better looking device. 

We’ve tried to only include major new iPod iterations in this list, but with the Nano series having gone through so many different form-factors over the years we thought the third generation would be worthy of inclusion. 

Functionally the third generation of the iPod Nano is almost identical to the rest of the Nano lineup. It had a full color screen, and kept the classic iPod scroll wheel. 

What was interesting however was its shape, which made it look more like a shrunken iPod Classic than a Nano (almost all of which are long and thin rather than squat and fat). 

At least it was portable.

Down at this end of the list is where we get into serious nostalgia territory. It’s not about the features down at this end, but the members of the iPod family that we have the fondest memories of, and the ones that broke new ground for the iPod. 

The Mini belongs firmly in the former camp. It didn’t do anything particularly new for iPods, sticking with a black and white screen and leaving the full color screens to the likes of the more premium iPod Photo (more on that later), but this is a machine we can vividly remember spending hours with. 

It might have had an utterly tiny capacity of just 4GB, and a somewhat disappointing 8 hours of playback, but in our minds this is one of the absolutely definitive iPods, released during the lineup’s prime. 

There’s nothing quite like the retro appeal of a monochrome screen, but its time was always numbered. 

2004’s iPod Photo was the first time a color screen appeared in the iPod lineup, and originally appeared as a spin-off to the 4th generation of iPod. 

The full color screen would later go on to grace later iPod classics, as well as every iPod Nano and Touch, but it all started with the iPod Photo. 

It was a screen that wouldn’t be able to play video until the following year’s 5th generation iPod, but we all appreciated the long-overdue return of album-artwork. 

The Shuffle line is another one that’s been through a fair number of different form factors, but after three attempts its fourth generation saw it settle upon a design that’s persisted since 2010. 

The fourth generation of Shuffle is what the line-up’s all about. You can’t select what songs will play - instead the device is set to automatically shuffle your whole library. 

It’s meant as something that’s easy to clip onto your t-shirt when you go out for a run, and as such isn’t the kind of device that’s meant for someone with a whole host of different playlists for their different moods. 

Or maybe it is if you’re the kind of person that’s as happy listening to MGMT as Enya on your morning run. We’re not going to judge. 

The sixth generation of the iPod Nano was a weird one. It pushed the boundaries of Apple's desire to rid the world of all buttons, and featured just a screen with no home button to speak of at all. 

It was certainly a bold design, and saw the Nano integrate the Shuffle’s clip for the first time, but with the 7th generation of the Nano the company returned to the portrait form factor and has never looked back. 

But hey, at least Apple have been willing to play around with the look of its iPods over the years. 

Relative to the millions that would go on to buy an iPod over the years, hardly anyone bought its first generation. 

And with good reason. For starters it only worked with Macs, and featured a weird mechanical scroll-wheel that felt primitive compared to the beautiful touch-wheels that would succeed it. 

We’re including the first generation of iPod on this list because it was a fantastic proof of concept for what was to come, but by modern standards it feels positively ancient. 

It says a lot that we’d put the third generation of Shuffle on this list below the original iPod, but it was a real low-point for the device thanks to the way it omitted any track or volume controls on the device itself. 

This meant that in order to control the device at all you were forced to use the Apple earbuds that it came bundled with, the same ones that most people trade in for a better pair of headphones almost immediately. 

What made matters worse was that headphones with in-line remotes were not nearly as common in 2009 as they are now, meaning that you were pretty much stuck with the bundled earbuds. 

Apple claims that its decision to drop the headphone jack was an act of courage in 2016, but frankly it’s nothing compared to the third generation of iPod Shuffle. 

Deezer gets a big audio boon thanks to link-up with podcast pioneers AudioBoom

Thu, 07/27/2017 - 07:00

Deezer has announced that it's bolstering its streaming service with hundreds of new podcasts, thanks to a partnership with AudioBoom.

AudioBoom is a distribution platform for podcasters that has built up a user base of 60 million listeners a month, thanks to high-profile celebrity endorsements from the likes of Stephen Fry and its frankly impressive podcast range. 

There are over 200 podcasts to choose from, ranging from true crime classic Undisclosed to Bob Mortimer and Andy Dawson's cracking comedy football podcast Athletico Mince. All of which will now be available to Deezer users – and given there's 12 million of them this is a savvy deal for both podcast listeners and those who are making the podcasts.

Beyond the music

This is the latest in a number of moves by Deezer to make it a streaming service that's about more than just music. 

In recent months it has expanded its sports coverage on the service, signing deals with both Barcelona FC and Man Utd, which has culminated in player playlists, news and exclusive football content. 

Its deal with AudioBoom – which isn't available in the US – means the football section of Deezer has ballooned with 37 new football podcasts, including the Official UEFA Champions League podcast.

“In addition to music, we believe in providing the best ultimate lean-back audio experience for our listeners," said Chris Baughen, VP Content & Productions at Deezer. 

"We are excited that our users around the world will now have access to a wider, more diverse range of content, thanks to our partnership with AudioBoom.” 

You can thank Stormtroopers for the look of Apple AirPods

Wed, 07/26/2017 - 18:36

I hate to break it to you, but if you’ve worn a pair of Apple EarPods or AirPods recently, you were tacitly supporting the Empire – you know, that military group from Star Wars that tried to control the universe through fear and exploitation. 

In what has to be one of the strangest conversations about the mash-up of Apple and Star Wars, well, ever, Apple design lead Jony Ive told Star Wars: The Force Awakens director J.J. Abrams that his primary inspiration for Apple’s iconic in-ear headphones were none other than Stormtroopers. 

This strange tidbit of information appeared in an interview in The Wall Street Journal where Ive was describing his design inspirations over the years. 

Crazy as it sounds, however, it sort of makes sense. 

Stormtroopers wear glossy white armor, Apple EarPods and AirPods have a glossy white encasing. Stormtroopers have a minimal aesthetic, Apple’s in-ear headphones have a minimal aesthetic. Stormtroopers are part and parcel in an evil empire’s pursuit to control the galaxy, Apple earbuds are … uh, nevermind.

Finding inspiration in a galaxy far, far away

While Ive is the latest in a long line of creatives to lift some inspiration from George Lucas’ iconic creation, he’s far from the only one. 

From the autonomous robots to some of the work done in hologram displays (cough, Microsoft HoloLens), the story of a farm boy defying physics to destroy his father’s legacy has inspired thousands of inventions, films, television shows and novels over the years.

That said, Apple has repaid the debt when Ive helped Abrams come up with the design for Kylo Ren’s three-pronged lightsaber in Star Wars Episode VII. 

According to a profile piece on Ive that ran in The New Yorker in 2015, Ive told Abrams that he thought Ren's lightsaber should be “more analog and more primitive and I think in that way, somehow more ominous,” in an attempt to convey Ren's interest in the archaic Sith arts. It worked. 

The best Australian Chromecast deals in July 2017

Mon, 07/24/2017 - 01:38

The Google Chromecast is not only one of the most useful and innovative gadgets of the last few years, it's also dazzlingly cheap. And if you're looking to pick one up for the cheapest possible price, you've come to the right place!

Chromecast is a Wi-Fi HDMI dongle that you plug directly into your TV. From there you can use your smartphone or tablet to 'throw' video at your TV over Wi-Fi – whether it be Netflix movies, live football matches from the major broadcasters or simply just a funny YouTube video. On this page we'll find you the best prices for the Chromecast Ultra, Chromecast 2 (or just Chromecast now) and Chromecast Audio and explain how they differ.

What is a good Chromecast deal?

This one's easy. The standard price for a Chromecast 2 is $55. You should never, ever pay more than that because you can always find one for that price.

Chromecast 2 deals

The Chromecast 2, or 'new Chromecast' as it's also known, is very similar to the now almost-extinct 2013 Chromecast. Sure, it looks a little different. And it's got slightly faster network performance and a few other tweaks such as coming with a dangly cable instead of as a rigid stick. But, essentially, it's the same product in a different shape – that's why the prices were basically the same. If you can find one for the same price, get this new one.

Chromecast Audio deals

While it doesn't offer true multi-room streaming at the moment (fingers crossed that comes soon), this easy-to-use and affordable device modernises any trusty set of wired speakers you already own with wireless capabilities. In doing so, it also opens them up to features that will grow and get even better over time. Got an old set of speakers or an ancient iPod dock? Turn it into a wireless speaker with Chromecast Audio!

Chromecast Ultra deals

The 4K Chromecast Ultra is the newest member of the Chromecast family. If you have a 4K TV or are planning on getting one, it's certainly worth picking one of these up. This micro streamer cheap, effective and makes the jump from 1080p to 4K HDR seamlessly.

Chromecast Ultra deals are usually around $95, so anything cheaper is an added bonus.

Apple’s AirPods 2 could stop your voice bouncing around inside your head

Fri, 07/21/2017 - 09:59

A newly surfaced Apple patent shows that the tech giant is working on solving the problem of that weird booming, echoey effect you get when talking while wearing noise-cancelling earbuds.

Technically called occlusion effect, it's created (in part) by the sound of your voice getting trapped in your ear canal. As your voice resonates through the bones of your skull, the earbud blocks your ear canal’s exit, turning it into a small echo chamber.

Apple looks to be working on a novel approach for solving this approach that uses a valve system to allow sound to travel out of your ear canal, hopefully mitigating the effect.

The patent, discovered by AppleInsider, references the fact that there are two different types of insertable earbuds: those that block the ear canal, and those that don’t.

While the ones that don’t (referred to in the patent as ‘leaky insertable in-ear speakers’ which doesn’t sound like something we’d want in our ear) don’t create  occlusion effects, they also allow ambient sound in, potentially disrupting the user’s audio experience. 

Watch out for traffic

Of course, having no ambient sound is also a negative thing, as it would affect user safety and ability to communicate while wearing the earbuds. The AirPod patent shows that a microphone would allow the user to hear the sounds of the ambient surroundings when they need to, but it looks like both the microphone and the valve can be deactivated when not needed.

What’s more, the sound that comes in from the external microphone looks like it's going to be tailored to the ear canal of the user. The patent states: “the ambient content audio signal is digitally processed in accordance with an equalization profile being a plurality of acoustic characteristics associated with the ear canal”.

What this should mean is that the digitally processed ambient sound feels more natural in your ear, and can be played at the same time as your content, so you can go for a run with your earbuds in, have good sound quality, and not have to worry about missing the sounds of hazards.

Of course, as this is just a patent there’s no guarantee that this technology will ever see the light of day, but as we learn more we’ll let you know.

Erm, Atari is making a hat... with speakers in it

Fri, 07/21/2017 - 08:42

The winner of today's 'Movie Tie-In We Were Not Expecting' award goes to Atari, which is teaming up with Audioware and collectibles company NECA to create a... hat with speakers in it. To accompany Blade Runner 2049's release later this year.

Yep. 

It's a strange one for the resurrected gaming company, now better known for licensing its branding than for anything else. It has had a busier year than usual thanks to the E3 tease of its forthcoming Ataribox console, which promises to offer both retro and modern gaming in an old-school package.

The 'Speakerhats' on the other hand seem bemusingly unambitious – though they claim to have "high-fidelity" speakers in their brim, they seem little more than a novelty, Atari-branded baseball cap. The only noteworthy element is a so-called "multiplayer mode" letting multiple Speakerhat-wearing pals listen in on the same audio stream, though strangers sitting nearby are unlikely to appreciate it.

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe

Alongside its Ataribox revival console, the company is now looking to put itself in a position to deliver a brand new range of Atari-branded gadgetry.

"With the recent reveal of our Ataribox project and now with Speakerhats, we envision a full range of connected personal devices that live at society's intersection of entertainment, technology and social connectivity that legendary film worlds like Blade Runner 2049 foretell," said AtariConnect COO Michael Arzt.

While it's difficult to see the link to the movie (the concept here is no more sci-fi than those beanie hats with built-in headphones), NECA COO Joel Weinshanker saw the Atari X Blade Runner partnership as the perfect match.

"The minute the new trailer hit, we started getting requests for Atari-branded Blade Runner 2049 products and knew we'd need to partner with Atari to satisfy the countless joint fans of both franchises," he said.

Rolling out in an extremely limited closed beta of just 10 units (to be won via a competition) there's no word yet on the wider release of the Speakerhats. We do have an approximate value though – $300, roughly converting to £230 / AU$380. They'd better be some mean-sounding speakers for that price, or all that cash will be lost... like... tears... in rain.

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